Monthly Archives: May 2019

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A-League: Milestone skipper Nigel Boogaard compares Newcastle Jets’ buzz to early years at Central Coast Mariners

DOUBLE TON: Nigel Boogaard at Ray Watt Oval on Thursday. Picture: Jonathan CarrollNigel Boogaard has been around long enough now to know the highs and lows of football life.
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And on the eve of notching up his 200thA-League appearance, which includes the inaugural FFA Cup title and a grand final loss almost 10 years ago, the homegrown skipperputs thiscurrent vibe at the undefeated Newcastle Jets right up there.

MILESTONE: Jets skipper Nigel Boogaard will make his 200th A-League appearance. Picture: Marina Neil

“I’d almost have to compare it to early days when I was at the [Central Coast] Mariners,” he said before making the trip to Adelaide for Saturday’s sixth-round clash with United.

“There’s just this camaraderie within the group. It’s a great bunch of boys and there’s a belief there that we can achievesomething.

“We all belivethat we have the right recipe to succeed this year, but we’re not getting ahead of ourselves.

“We’re five games in and it’s been a great start, but we’re nowhere near where we believe we can be in a lot of aspects of the game.

“At the moment there’s just a good buzz and a good vibe around the club so hopefully we can carry that on throughout the season.”

FAMILY: Nigel Boogaard with wife Kerryn and daughter Audrey in July. Picture: Marina Neil

The Dudley-Redhead junioris now31,husband to wife Kerryn and father to three-month-old daughter Audrey. It’s a far cry from the teenager that debuted off the bench more thana decade ago in the old National Soccer League competition.

“That first taste was only a few minutes, but it was enough for me to go I belong here and I think I can make a career out of this,” he said.

“That was the first time I genuinely believed it and looking back I’m thankful to be given that opportunity at such a youngage.

“A lot’s changed [since then]. I’d say I’ma lot more mature these days. I’m a family man, I’ve got a daughter and a beautiful wife.

“Perspective on life changes as you grow and my football knowledge has comea long way. Hopefullywhat I’ve learned over the last 13 or 14 years as a professional I can pass on now to some of the younger players.”

BODY AND SOUL: Nigel Boogaard wins a header for Adelaide against the Jets. He played 98 times for United.

The central defender started out with the Mariners, originally signed and kept by now Jets chief executive officer Lawrie McKinna despite setbacks. Boogaard thenmoved to Adelaide for six campaignsbefore returning to Newcastle from 2015.

The most-capped Jets captain will become the 23rdperson to reach the double-century milestoneand isone of thefew remaining players from theA-League’sinception in 2005-2006.

“It’s exciting times and hopefully there’s a few more years in this body and there’s a few more milestones and achievements to come,” he said.

STARTING OUT: A young Nigel Boogaard in action for his first A-League club, Central Coast Mariners.

‘In a bad mood’: Kangaroo attacks man on South Coast

A kangaroo “in a bad mood” has left a man in hospital on the South Coast, after attacking the 80-year-old on Thursday.
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NSW paramedics treated the man about 10:45am in Bendalong for multiple cuts to his lower legs suffered during the attack, including “one and a half inch lacerations below the knee”.

Attending Paramedic Rob Hilliar said the man fed the local roos each morning and one had become particularly aggressive.

“He’s a lovely bloke who spoils them a little, feeding them jam and cream on toast,” Mr Hilliar said.

“On this occasion one of the roos was in a bad mood and pushed him over.”

The man was taken to Milton Ulladulla Hospital in a stable condition, where he remained as of Thursday afternoon.

A spokesman for NSW Ambulance said, while he had not heard of any other recent incidents of kangaroos attacking people, anecdotally the animals were known to be aggressive at times, especially during mating season.

He said this particular roo was unharmed in the incident, watching on “presumably in amusement” as paramedics treated the man before hopping off.

“The bloke came off second best,” he said. “But maybe aside from his pride, he seems to be doing ok.”

In the past three months, NSW Ambulance said paramedics had attended 38 incidents involving kangaroos, three with wombats and two involving possums, though the incidents largely involved collisions with cars.

NSW Parks and Wildlife warns people against feeding kangaroos on its website.

“Kangaroos and wallabies eat a range of native grasses and herbs and are adapted to chewing and digesting these grasses,” it says.

“When kangaroos and wallabies become used to being hand-fed, they sometimes attack people in their quest for food. Remember, they have sharp claws and a strong kick.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Hunter schools must have ‘consistent’ enrolment policies

Change: Minister for Education Rob Stokes, pictured in the Hunter on Tuesday, said a principal should not accept out of zone enrolments “from an area without consulting the principal of the school in that area”. Picture: Simone De PeakHUNTER schools need to more consistentlyenforce their enrolment policies to help alleviate overcrowding, according to Minister for Education Rob Stokes.
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Mr Stokes told the Newcastle Herald his department had asked principals to work more closely together and have “clear agreements” about accommodating out of zone enrolments.

“When we have schools which are operating above capacity and there is strong demand continuing in that school from out of area enrolments, we actually have to be real and say ‘We have to identify what that reason is’,” Mr Stokes said.

“Largely I suspect it’s reputation, it’s not based in reality.

“So we need to demystify that, but also make sure there is agreement between local principals before out of area enrolments are accelerated, because otherwise it does not matter how many classrooms we build if we don’t also engage with enrolment policy.

“The heart of public education is there are local schools in local communities to serve local families and when that’s breaking down you can’t win that challenge.”

Several Hunter schools have already amended their enrolment policies and closed places to new out of zone families, with plans to soon ban even the younger siblings of current students.

Belair has 530 students this year. Its enrolment ceiling is 502 and includes a buffer of 19.

Biddabah has 438 students. Its enrolment ceiling of392 includes a buffer of 12.

Hamilton South has 419 students. Its enrolment ceiling of 366 includes a buffer of 14.

Newcastle East has 247 students. Its enrolment ceiling of 211 includes a buffer of 14.

The Junction has 608 students. Its enrolment ceiling is 548 with a buffer of 42.

The Herald reported in May this year the Hunter had topped the state for its proportion (41 per cent ) of public high schools either full or exceeding capacity, based on their number of permanent classrooms.

A NSW Opposition freedom of information request showed 10 Hunter schools installed at least five demountable classrooms, in the absence of permanent infrastructure. Rutherford Technology High had 15.

The department said at the time it was preparing for major upgrades to Hunter Sports High School, Bolwarra Public School and the Hunter School of Performing Arts.

It said nine schools were being upgraded as part of the Secondary Schools Renewal Program, including Cardiff, which is expected to be completedthis year.

It also announced in the same month Rutherford Technology High would receive $1.8 million, Irrawang High $1.1 million, Cessnock High $1.05 million and Hunter River High $1 million for maintenance.

Mr Stokes said the government wouldn’t let a school operate at an unsafe level.

“One of the fundamentals of public education is it’s open to all comers, so we will always find room in a local school and if that requires putting up temporary accommodation to accommodate unprecedented or unexpected demand we’ll do that,” he said.

“However we do need to look at where that unexpected demand is then sustained and you’ve got demountables on a site for extended periods of time.

“We need to build more permanent classrooms and we’re doing that across the state.

“But the second thing is we need to be clear and consistent in relation to enrolment policy.

“We can’t have, for example, a principal accepting out of area enrolments from an area without consulting the principal of the school in that area, so they need to talk to one another.

“As a department I’ve asked for that to be enforced a bit more so there’s some clear agreement.”

Mr Stokes said the innovative major upgrade to landlocked Newcastle East –which involves building a new structure with four classrooms over the top of the covered outdoor learning area –was the kind of “out of the box” solution that could be applied across the state.

“The lessons we can learn from it are not necessarily replicable in Newcastle but they’re replicable in many parts of Sydney where you have these constrained sites, historic buildings and very engaged local communities,” he said.

“There are no fixed rules, every site is different, every school community is different and that is why our method with school infrastructure is to have a project control group locally so the school can be co-created with the community.”

Mr Stokes said the department would continue to build schools to meet growth.

Celebrating 200 years of hospital health care in NewcastlePHOTOS

200 years of hospital care in the Hunter Hospital history: A Royal Newcastle Hospital ward in 1939. Dr. R Strurrock, later to become a well-known orthopaedic surgeon in Sydney, is pictured with Sr. Hilda Porter (matron in the late 1950’s) and nurses Sawtell, Atkins and McCam. This photograph is from the Hospital archives held by the University Archives in Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library, the University of Newcastle, Australia.Royal Newcastle Hospital graduation (1958) From left to right Loraine Newcombe, Margaret Hodgon, Robin Masson, and Heather Pengilley. This photograph is from the Hospital archives held by the University Archives in Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library, the University of Newcastle, Australia.
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Hospital history: Matron Porter and Dr. McCaffrey, Royal Newcastle Hospital.This photograph is from the Hospital archives held by the University Archives in Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library, the University of Newcastle, Australia.

Hospital history: Royal Newcastle Hospital graduation (1958). From left to right Loraine Newcombe, Margaret Hodgon, Robin Masson, and Heather Pengilley.This photograph is from the Hospital archives held by the University Archives in Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library, the University of Newcastle, Australia.

Hospital history: Royal Newcastle Hospital – North Wing.This photograph is from the Hospital archives held by the University Archives in Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library, the University of Newcastle, Australia.

Hospital history: Royal Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, [c.1914] In front is a dray with four horses, carrying a miniature horse and a loaded coal skip, as for a parade. Richard McAuliffe is in shirt sleeves.

Hospital history: Royal Newcastle Hospital – North Wing, taken from overlooking building. This photograph is from the Hospital archives held by the University Archives in Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library, the University of Newcastle, Australia.

Hospital history: Ward room, Royal Newcastle Hospital. This photograph is from the Hospital archives held by the University Archives in Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library, the University of Newcastle, Australia.

Hospital history: Moving cartons of medication, Royal Newcastle Hospital’s Pharmacy. This photograph is from the Hospital archives held by the University Archives in Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library, the University of Newcastle, Australia.

John Hunter Hospital: This image was scanned from a photograph in the University’s historical photographic collection held by Cultural Collections at the University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia.

John Hunter: Nick Saunders standing outside the John Hunter Hospital site, New Lambton, Australia. This image was scanned from a photograph in the University’s historical photographic collection held by Cultural Collections at the University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia.

John Hunter: Aerial view of the John Hunter Hospital during its construction, New Lambton, Australia.This image was scanned from a photograph in the University’s historical photographic collection held by Cultural Collections at the University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia.

John Hunter: Sue Johnson with an unidentified nursing student at John Hunter Hospital, the University of Newcastle, Australia – 1992.This image was scanned from a film negative housed in the University’s historical photographic collection held by Cultural Collections at the University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia.

Cake ‘goodbye RNH, hello JHH’, Royal Newcastle Hospital. [n.d.] From: Outpatients – black album, Royal Newcastle Hospital. ColourThis photograph is from the Hospital archives held by the University Archives in Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library, the University of Newcastle, Australia.

Rankin Park Unit of the Royal Newcastle Hospital, located on the site of the present John Hunter Hospital (n.d.) This photograph is from the Hospital archives held by the University Archives in Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library, the University of Newcastle, Australia.

Archery at the Rankin Park Unit of the Royal Newcastle Hospital c.1950-1960’s The Rankin Park Unit is located on the site of the present John Hunter Hospital. This photograph is from the Hospital archives held by the University Archives in Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library, the University of Newcastle, Australia.

Nursing students on training placement at John Hunter Hospital with nursing lecturer, Sue Johnson, the University of Newcastle, Australia – 1992

Unidentified nurse playing mini golf on the grounds of the Rankin Park Unit of the Royal Newcastle Hospital c.1950-1960’s The Rankin Park Unit is located on the site of the present John Hunter Hospital. This photograph is from the Hospital archives held by the University Archives in Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library, the University of Newcastle, Australia.

TweetFacebook Take a look through the archivesThe photographs are from the Hospital archives held by the University Archives in Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library, the University of Newcastle, Australia.NEWCASTLE’S achievements in health care during the past 200 years aresomething to be remembered andcelebrated, as history shows theHunter’s medical fraternityto be a down-to-earth but determined bunch,Dr Ross Kerridge says.

The Hunter Postgraduate Medical Institute will host a publicevent at HMRI on Saturday tomark the 200thanniversary of the first hospital opening in Newcastle.

Event convenor Dr Kerridge said while there had been many changes in the past 200 years,such as the closing of the old Royal Hospital on Newcastle beach, the region’s health care was not defined by buildings, bricks or location, but by “people, commitment, and a sense of vocation.”

“It is easy to focus on the negative things,” he said.

“But I think we should concentrate on celebrating all that we have achieved, and are continuing to achieve.

“The buildings may move around, but we’ve got an ongoing tradition of healthcare and hospitals in Newcastle that has its own particular flavour of being based in the community, not taking itself too seriously, of being hard-working and getting on with it – and making do with less resources than people in Sydney have, and that’s an ongoing thing – it’s been there for 200 years, and it’s going to continue for another 200 years.”

Throughout Saturday’s event, the general public would learn about the history of health care in the region, such as battle to get the John Hunter Hospital established.

“There was a huge political fight, and they had to fight,” Dr Kerridge said.

“The waterside workers threatened to blockade all the ports of NSW unless Neville Wran agreed to fund John Hunter Hospital.

“That would have been in the early 1980s.

“Essentially, they had the old Royal, the Mater, and the Western Suburbs Hospital at Waratah,which was a tin shed, and Wallsend –and they were bursting at the seams. But the government in Sydney was still reluctant to cough up the money, and hello, we’re hearing the same thing again about Maitland.

“They are not going to cough up the money easily. You can’t just say we want our fair share, no. You have to fight for it.”

Event-goers would also learn how Newcastle became known as the “Bex capital of the world,”and how our penchantfor “a cup of tea, a Bex and a good lie down” contributed to the opening of a renal department from the subsequent kidney damage.

There will bestories about the Newcastle Medical School, the Hunter medicos who worked on the Burma Railway, and why Newcastle is a good place to have a stroke.

The free event is on at the HMRI building on November 11. Registration from 8.20am.

Find out more.

Coffee mogul Phil Di Bella lists New Farm home with $6m+ price guide

Deep in New Farm, Brisbane’s resident king of coffee Phil Di Bella and wife Gianna built what they had planned to be a forever home for themselves and their two children.
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“We have built other homes before that look stunning, but I didn’t enjoy living there but with Turner Avenue, it’s so liveable and perfect. It just works,” Mrs Di Bella said “It’s got a homely feel yet it has huge street appeal and immense presence.”

The Di Bellas built the exemplary four bedroom home on a rare, empty, 636 square metre block at 30 Turner Avenue four years ago.

The contemporary home was future-proofed for ongoing family life, with Mrs Di Bella advising the architect on what their family needed as the kids grew up.

“We wanted a master suite separate from our kids and our intention was to raise our the kids here as they got older,” she said.

“It’s a wonderful home that has been perfectly designed to include so many features characteristic of modern day living. It’s perfect to lock up and leave which is great when we spend a lot of time at the Gold Coast.”

Phil Di Bella became coffee royalty when his roasting business Di Bella Coffee spread across Australia, and then the rest of the world. He sold the company in 2014 for a potential $47 million, and retains an active role in the business.

The immense house has 547-square metres of floor space, which includes a cinema, guest suite, and a home office. Related: Sunshine Coast’s property hotspots revealedRelated: Why interstate buyers flock to BribieRelated: Millions in Brisbane property left to rot

Outside, the rest of the block is dedicated to outdoor living areas with a pool, sauna, and built-in barbecue.

There’s also full automation throughout the house, with keyless entry, CCTV, lights, and intercom systems.

The striking black facade and screens over the front balconies are also sure to impress.

Ray White New Farm’s Matt Lancashire has the listing, he said the home had left him amazed.

“It’s generously proportioned with a modern and minimalist floor plan. I love it,” he said. “It truly delivers on its brief to have seamless indoor and outdoor entertainment with functionality, space and privacy in mind for the most modern family living.”

The Di Bellas are giving up on what would be their forever home to buy a block with more grass for the two kids, aged nine and seven, to play on.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.